COLORADO CANNABIS STORES PART 3: MONEY, LAWS, DISTRIBUTION, COMMENTS ON TINCTURES AND TOPICALS

cannabis-dew-drop-tincture

Good old Google. I went to a site yesterday and up pops an ad about investing in the cannabis industry. Strange isn’t it. I post a few articles on an obscure blog and go to a few sites related to the subject and they’re already targeting me.

But I’m not complaining because I did follow the link and it brought me to a video some “research” company produced. It must have been for pensioners because it was so long-at least 10 minutes by the time I stopped watching it – so I didn’t get a chance to get my “free” booklet from them on investing in the industry.

Nevertheless it did perk my interest in finding ways to invest in the industry. The video itself highlighted penny stocks being offered by small companies that have products and services that support the cannabis industry-and the tremendous gains their examples had made over the last few years.

The funny thing is several weeks ago we met with our financial advisor at Edward Jones and I asked him about investing in cannabis-related businesses. He told while he’d love to help us do that- because of the federal laws against cannabis use, the company doesn’t offer any access to these companies in the investment portfolios it creates.

It would seem like this would be a good time to look at the possibilities. With California poised to pass recreational use this fall the industry is set to continue showing fantastic growth.  This year it’s projected to be about 7 billion and by 2020, 22 billion dollars-that’s 10 more than the NFL does.

And these are just the numbers for actual cannabis sales. It doesn’t take into account all the related businesses, products and services that support the industry. You have  companies like Praetorian Property which specializes in finding real estate for growers and stores, lighting and green house manufacturers, Vape-started by an ex CIA person I think-which has seen tremendous growth with its smoking device ,one that has Lego-like sections of buildings that fit together in a modular fashion allowing configurations as needed by the cannabis store or grower and of course-lawyers. Graham Sorkin, business development head at Mary’s Medicinal based in WA told me it felt like they are as many lawyers as employees involved in the industry.

That makes sense when you consider the complexity and differences between the states and their laws around cannabis. Anyone actually interested in manufacturing a product with cannabis or having a store pretty much has to go to one of a number of law firms with a cannabis focus – plus they know all the players who might open to investment or working with you on a product offering.

The law is everywhere.  The gentleman at Mary’s helped clear up one question I’d posed in my earlier posts about cannabis stores regarding the point of purchase in the stores and the lack of impulse items up there.

Colorado law does not permit a fixture out in front of the counter at this time. I’m assuming that explains why the magazine rack I saw in the Pueblo store is behind the counter. That seems odd. But then again under CO Law buds, wax, tinctures and edibles-anything that you consume must be kept in a different place from the non-consumable products like pipes & papers.

I was also told that while the Washington-based company came up with a Rescue Remedy type tincture for those who got too high they were required to take what I call “The Bloody Mary” approach as Colorado law mandates that there has to be at least a bare minimum they proscribe of active THC in the tincture in order to sell it in a cannabis store.

And while these cannabis shops are retail stores the law prevents distribution companies –those with a multitude of products from different manufacturers-from operating in the way they do in almost every other industry like grocery, book stores, and so on.

It’s state by state but in CO you cannot be a distributor –a middle man in the process. The stores either create their own products for sale in their retail establishments or if they carry someone else’s product that manufacturer itself has to provide it directly to the store.

Yes there are lots of paths to navigate. Take transactions. While cash is still king you can now use a debit card in Colorado stores. These transactions are processed through credit unions which do not have the same burden of federal laws to follow that regular banks have to abide by. So until there’s a national rewriting of the law you’re not going to find Wells Fargo or Bank of America involved.

I’m not aware of any specific stances the big banks have on cannabis-whether they’re for or against it but I did read where Sheldon Adelson the man whose efforts changed the focus of Las Vegas income streams has poured money into fighting legalization both in NV and Florida, while Dr. Bronner the famous soap maker out of CA has given $100,000 to helping to pass a recreational cannabis law in AZ this fall.

Granted the whole cannabis subject is polarizing for many. But as one who has spent a few nights in hotel rooms around the country doing some channel surfing I have to wonder if making cannabis more available can be any worse than what I see on TV. It’s astounding how many commercials touting anti-depressants are on. And while I remember some books by Macrobiotics founder George Oshawa written in the early 1960’s specifically stating that the U.S. had mental health problem it’s still amazing to think we’re that messed up as a society in this regard.

That’s why I find the cannabis tinctures with active THC of interest. Based on my experiments with the tincture I believe they’re worth looking at by people who might only need a gentle lift not a full on mental make over.

There’s a learning curve –basically how much to use. It’s typically taken via a dropper ideally sublingually rather than put in coffee or water. The one I tried was flavored with vanilla. You’re basically talking about one to three drops. And it should be taken as recommended by people in the cannabis stores-after eating as this helps buffer the physical effects of the tincture.

One time I took it without having eaten anything  and experienced an uncomfortable feeling in my stomach for a while as a result.

As for effects while these things are always individual I found the tincture to work well with regards to just a subtle “lift” to the mood, a sense of well-being, as well as, an ability to help focus on a task-which may seem counter to the usual cannabis experience except the tincture’s method of preparation isn’t meant to deliver a knock- out punch.

To my mind the tincture’s straddling of both medicinal and recreational highlights what could be viewed as an out-right prejudice our society has but never really acknowledges.  While we certainly cater to victims and seem to put tremendous resources behind unearthing more and more of them there seems to be one that no one wants to talk about.

I’m talking about the bias against the person who already feels good and wants to highlight that feeling-feel even better. In a way it reminds me of the Smart Drugs fad in the 1990’s where magazines like Wired did articles on the various formulations (which also included a fair amount of caffeine) appearing at that time designed to boost your brain power.

In one pop up art exhibition in an abandoned space we did in Santa Fe we featured a smart bar at a musical event we held in the space. It was a popular offering.

The topical pain treatments seem to have an easier path for acceptance among the general population as they don’t have to actually use activated THC in order to be effective according to some of their manufacturers.

While most of the ones I’ve seen and used do,  there are others that feature the CBC cannabis compound and- not active THC- which is said to mimic the active THC properties by merging with the same receptors in the brain and body that the THC does.

I can’t say for myself whether this is true as all I’ve tried are the ones with both THC and CBD. It’s my understanding that those topicals that only have the CBC and not THC or CBD are not treated in the same way by the law as those with activated THC/CBD compounds.

There are some different effects in terms of activation that I’ve noticed. For instance the crème picture below seems to have a greater concentration of aromatic substances like peppermint and juniper which gives it a more penetrating feeling after it’s applied.

cannabis-topical-creme

Considering that the industry’s still in its infancy we’ll see many more variations on cannabis orientated compounds not to mention the growing segment of edibles-gourmet edibles that chiefs are taking up as the industry makes the next leap on the back of the the current group of states looking at legalizing cannabis.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *